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Endoscopy

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Maui Memorial Medical Center
Ambulatory Care Services 
808.242.2424

  • Inpatient
  • Outpatient

Your comfort, care and safety are foremost on the minds of our skilled professionals in endoscopy services. Whether you're coming to our department as an inpatient or outpatient, we want to make sure your visit in our hospital's surgical center is as pleasant as possible.

Endoscopy services

Endoscopy is a medical procedure in which a scope with a light and camera on the end is used to see inside your organs. A colonoscope is used to view the colon and large intestine, for example. A gastroscope is used to view the stomach and duodenum, which is the beginning of the small intestine.

An endoscopic procedure can be used to screen for disease, such as cancer. It also can be part of the treatment, such as removing polyps or stopping bleeding.

The Endoscopy Department at Maui Memorial Medical Center (MMMC) uses a wide variety of endoscopes for procedures, including:

A skilled team of endoscopy professionals

When you have an endoscopy at MMMC, you will be cared for by an experienced team of professionals. In addition to your doctor or surgeon, your team will include a certified gastrointestinal (GI) assistant and nurse experienced in gastroenterology and endoscopy procedures. Depending on your procedure, a board-certified anesthesiologist also might be on hand to administer sedation.

MMMC's suites for procedures are equipped with state-of-the-art equipment. We are based in the hospital, so in the unlikely event that a complication arises treatment can take place right here.

Infection prevention is our highest priority, and we maintain high-level disinfectant practices.

What to expect

When you choose Maui Health for a GI procedure, you'll have your own private room where a nurse and nurse aide will help prepare you. If your procedure requires an anesthesiologist, he or she will check in with you to discuss sedation. Also, your doctor will ask if you have any last-minute questions.

Depending on the procedure, you can expect to be out of the procedure room within 15 minutes to one hour.

We have a large waiting area for your family and support people. The waiting area has a status board that allows your loved ones to see where you're at in the process. After your procedure, our team will update the person you've designated.

We'll also discuss the findings of the procedure with you before you leave, and provide thorough discharge and follow-up instructions.

Check your risk for colorectal cancer

Some risk factors for colorectal cancer you can change; others you can't. But even for risk factors you can't modify, just being aware of them may help you and your doctor decide when and how often you should be screened for the disease.

Check your risk for colorectal cancer


reviewed 11/19/2019

Colorectal cancer risk assessment

Answering the following questions can help you learn more about your possible risk factors for colorectal cancer.

Note: This assessment is not intended to be a substitute for a visit with your healthcare provider.

Do you have a parent, brother, sister or child who has had colorectal cancer?

If you answered "yes." Having a family history can increase your risk, especially if your family member developed cancer at a young age or if two or more of your relatives had the disease at any age. People with a family history of colorectal cancer should talk to their doctors about beginning screening for the disease before age 45 (the age at which screening is recommended for the general population).

If you answered "no." While having a family history of colorectal cancer can increase your risk for the disease, it's important to remember that most people who develop the disease don't have a family history.

Have you had colorectal cancer?

If you answered "yes." If you've had colorectal cancer before, you have an increased risk of developing it again, even if the first cancer was completely removed.

If you answered "no." If you've had colorectal cancer before, you have an increased risk of developing it again, even if the first cancer was completely removed.

Have you had colorectal polyps?

If you answered "yes." Having adenomatous polyps can increase your risk for cancer—especially if you have many of them or they are large.

If you answered "no." Having adenomatous polyps can increase your risk for cancer—especially if you have many of them or they are large.

Are you older than 50?

If you answered "yes." The chances of developing colorectal cancer increase after age 50. In fact, about 90% of people who are diagnosed with colorectal cancer are older than 50.

If you answered "no." While most people who develop colorectal cancer are older than 50, younger adults can still develop the disease.

Do you have an inflammatory bowel disease, like ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease?

If you answered "yes." Over time, diseases that cause inflammation of the colon can raise the risk for cancer. If you have one of these diseases, you'll need to be screened for colorectal cancer more often than a person at average risk. Your doctor can help you decide on an appropriate screening schedule.

If you answered "no." Over time, diseases that cause inflammation of the colon can raise the risk for cancer. If you have one of these diseases, you'll need to be screened for colorectal cancer more often than a person at average risk. Your doctor can help you decide on an appropriate screening schedule.

Do you eat a lot of red or processed meats?

If you answered "yes." Eating a lot of red or processed meats can increase your risk for colorectal cancer. Meanwhile, diets high in fruits and vegetables have been linked to a decreased risk for colorectal cancer.

If you answered "no." Not eating a lot of red or processed meats means you're avoiding a potential risk factor for colorectal cancer. If you eat a lot of fruits and vegetables, you're doing even better. Diets high in fruits and vegetables have been linked to a decreased risk for colorectal cancer.

Do you get little or no physical activity?

If you answered "yes." There are many reasons for you to try to get more exercise. To help prevent cancer, get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise spread throughout the week.

If you answered "No, I regularly exercise." Great! Regular exercise can help your health in a variety of ways. To help prevent cancer, get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise spread throughout the week.

Are you obese?

If you answered "yes." Being obese increases your risk of developing and dying from colorectal cancer.

If you answered "no." Maintaining a healthy weight is important for your health in many ways. Take steps to maintain your weight by staying active and eating right.

Do you smoke?

If you answered "yes." Long-term smokers are more likely than nonsmokers to develop and die from colorectal cancer.

If you answered "no." Not smoking is a healthy choice. Long-term smokers are more likely than nonsmokers to develop and die from colorectal cancer.

Results

Each question to which you answered yes is one risk factor for colorectal cancer. No matter how many (or how few) risk factors you have, regular screening for colorectal cancer is one of the best ways to stop the disease. Screening helps detect cancers early, when treatment is more effective. According to the American Cancer Society, more than 90% of people whose colorectal cancer is found and treated before it has spread survive at least five years.

Screening tests are generally recommended beginning at age 45, even if you have no symptoms. Earlier tests may be recommended depending on your family history and other factors.

Sources: American Cancer Society; American Society of Clinical Oncology

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Contact us

Maui Memorial Medical Center
Ambulatory Care Services 
808.242.2424

  • Inpatient
  • Outpatient